AbbVie takes on cystic fibrosis, providing 40 grants to students

 

AbbVie yesterday announced the 40 outstanding students with cystic fibrosis (CF) who will each receive $2,500 to pursue their undergraduate or graduate school education during the 2014-2015 school year through the AbbVie CF Scholarship program. Voting for two of the 40 winners to earn the title of 2014 Thriving Undergraduate or Graduate Scholar is now open to the public at www.AbbVieCFScholarship.com until September 15.

Inspirational stories from students living with CF are spotlighted on the AbbVie CF Scholarship website,www.AbbVieCFScholarship.com. The site also includes instructions on how the public can vote for undergraduate and graduate scholars, by voting either online or texting 23000 with the unique ID provided assigned to the specific scholar (e.g., VOTE1, VOTE2, etc.).

“The achievement and dedication shown by the AbbVie CF Scholarship recipients continue to impress us each year,” said Jim Hynd, vice president, GI Care, AbbVie. “Students with CF face significantly more mental, physical and emotional challenges than those who do not suffer the symptoms of this disease, and AbbVie is honored to support their academic endeavors as they become role models for the CF community.”

AbbVie is proud to continue the legacy of the CF Scholarship program. Over the course of the 22 years of the scholarship’s existence, hundreds of students living with CF have received an estimated $2.4 million in educational funding.

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-threatening genetic disease that primarily affects the lungs and digestive system. An estimated 30,000 children and adults in the United States (70,000 worldwide) have CF.


Quick Facts about CFIn the United States:

  • About 1,000 new cases of CF are diagnosed each year.
  • More than 75 percent of people with CF are
    diagnosed by age 2.
  • Nearly half of the CF population is age 18 or older.

In people with CF, a defective gene and its protein product cause the body to produce unusually thick, sticky mucus that:

  • Clogs the lungs and leads to life-threatening lung infections.
  • Obstructs the pancreas and stops natural enzymes from helping the body break down food and absorb vital nutrients.

In the 1950s, few children with CF lived to attend elementary school. Since then, tremendous progress in understanding and treating CF has led to dramatic improvements in the length and quality of life for those with CF. Many people with the disease can now expect to live into their 30s, 40s and bey.

Last year AbbVie entered into a partnership to study treatments for cystic fibrosis with Dutch drug developer Galapagos NV. The deal could be worth more than $405 million to Galapagos.

The companies will study oral drugs designed to target and correct the main genetic mutations seen in cystic fibrosis patients, and they want to begin early-stage clinical testing by the end of 2014.